Vegan Fish Finger Pie with Parsley Sauce

vegan fish finger pie

I ate my first ploughman’s lunch last year. I’d seen other people with them on numerous occasions and they looked interesting – all that picky stuff to eat looked right up my street. Whenever I saw it on a menu though I always swerved it for a hot meal instead because who the flipping flop goes out to eat a bit of bread and cheese and pickle? Then one day last year I thought I MUST HAVE A PLOUGHMAN’S and off in search of one I went.

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Savoy and Sesame Noodles With Tofu from ‘Vegan in 15’

Vegan in 15 by Kate Ford

Back in 2010, I entered a competition to win the title of ‘UK’s Tastiest Meat-Free Dish‘ where the winner’s recipe would be included in the range of Linda McCartney products. Fellow food blogger Kate Ford – who blogs at The Veg Space – won with her mushroom and ale pie. I reckon Kate either bribed or slept with the judges because why the flipping flop would they choose a pie over my cheese-covered aubergine, eh? I mean, come on, look –  it’s a masterpiece!

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Aubergine, Mushroom and Sweet Potato Massaman Curry

Aubergine, mushroom and sweet potato massaman curry

The first time I had a massaman curry was in a Thai restaurant in Ashford. I was happily tucking away, thinking how gorgeous it was, when I saw a massive lump of beef sticking out of it. Obviously, I stopped eating it and told the staff, who apologised and offered to make me another – meat free – one but, unsurprisingly, I’d gone off the idea of eating. That wasn’t the first time I’d found meat in a meal:

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Portobello Mushroom Burgers & Potato Wedges

Portobello mushroom burgers and homemade potato wedges

Portobello mushroom burgers are the best veggie burgers you can get. I’m all for the more ‘meaty’ veggie burgers, like the Linda McCartney ones but when you’re out and about, the veggie burgers on offer are usually more of the indistinguishable mushed-up vegetables coated in breadcrumbs variety. So, when I see mushroom burgers on the menu, that’s what I always go for, especially when they’re topped with halloumi which is how The Foundry pub in Canterbury serves them. The mushroom burgers in that pub are so good, even my meat-eating friend gets one when we go there instead of one of the many meat dishes they sell.

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Vegan Omelette with Silken Tofu Recipe

Vegan omelette with silken tofu

Home alone means YAY I GET TO BE REALLY VEGAN and by ‘really vegan’ I mean I get to try things I haven’t made before like a vegan omelette made with silken tofu, such as this one I based on the one at the brilliant Post Punk Kitchen.

Vegan omelette batter made with silken tofu

Vegan omelette made with silken tofu

This vegan omelette was so good. It was quick and easy and although you’re not going to fool egg-eaters with it, this soft, tasty omelette was lovely stuffed with mushrooms, spring onions and spinach, and as the batter made enough for four omelettes and will keep well in the fridge or freezer, I had one cold the next day for lunch, used as a wrap with pesto, spinach, tomato and cucumber.

Vegan omelette wrap

Like a lot of vegan ‘eggy’ dishes, this silken tofu omelette contained black salt (or kala namak as it’s also known) to give it an eggy taste. Black salt is cheap on Amazon but you can leave it out if you’re not that bothered about an eggy flavour.

vegan-silken-tofu-omelette

 

Vegan Omelette with Silken Tofu Recipe
Cuisine: Vegan
Author: Cathy @ Planet Veggie
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 349g pack silken tofu
  • 2 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp fine black salt
  • 1/2 cup chickpea flour
  • 1 tbsp potato starch
Instructions
  1. Prepare your chosen fillings before you start making the omelette and leave to one side
  2. Blend the garlic, tofu, nutritional yeast, olive oil, turmeric and black salt until smooth
  3. Add the chickpea flour and potato starch and blend until it’s all combined
  4. Heat a lightly oiled large frying pan and pour in 1/2 cup of the batter
  5. Use the back of a spoon to spread the batter out to make a thin circle
  6. Let it cook for about 3-5 minutes, until lightly browned on the bottom
  7. Flip the omelette over and cook for another minute or so
  8. Spread your prepared fillings evenly over half the omelette and fold over the other side
  9. Repeat with the rest of the batter

 




 

 

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Vegan Pinto Bean Stuffed Peppers Recipe

Vegan pinto bean stuffed pepper

This vegan pinto bean stuffed peppers recipe is loosely based on the Chillies Stuffed With Beans recipe in Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s vegetarian cookbook River Cottage Veg Everyday! Although Hugh’s version would undoubtedly be better than mine, his recipe involved grilling and peeling chillies and there is no way I could ever be arsed to a) peel a chilli pepper; or b) stuff something that small, so I bunged a couple of peppers in the oven and stuffed those instead.

The pinto bean stuffing is pretty much the same as Hugh’s except I left out coriander and cumin because I’m not keen on coriander and every time I use cumin, The Meat Eater says it tastes of farts and I wasn’t in the mood for any stupid talk like that (by the way, in case you’re wondering, The Meat Eater is 44, not 4).

I loved the bean filling in these peppers – it’s not dissimilar to baked beans in tomato sauce – and I also thought it would make a good sandwich filling. The Meat Eater didn’t enjoy it as much as I did but I think he was in a moany mood as he also complained about having a green pepper and not a red one (even though I offered to swap) and said the peas were too chewy.

Next time, I’ll tell him to rearrange this sentence: dinner your make own fucking

Vegan Pinto Bean Stuffed Peppers Recipe
Cuisine: Vegan
Author: Cathy @ Planet Veggie
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • 2 red or green peppers, deseeded
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 shallots, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 150g tomatoes, halved
  • 400g tin pinto beans (or other beans of your choice)
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. Put the peppers on a baking tray and bake for about 20 minutes at 200C until tender and the skin is slightly browning
  2. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a frying pan and fry the shallots and garlic for a couple of minutes, until soft
  3. Grate the tomatoes into the pan, and discard the skins
  4. Remove from the heat, add the beans and lightly mash with a fork, leaving plenty whole
  5. Add the paprika and season with salt and pepper
  6. Stuff the bean mixture into the peppers and return to the oven for another 20 minutes

 

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Expedia World on a Plate – Vegetarian Bulgarian Recipes

Hands up who knows where Bulgaria is? In case you’re like me and your knowledge of Bulgaria begins and ends with a certain Womble called Uncle, then here’s a map for you.

Map showing where Bulgaria is
Bulgaria: nowhere near Wimbledon

So, when Expedia asked me if I’d take part in their World on a Plate Challenge and cook something from Bulgaria, although I had no idea if Bulgarians ate nothing but fried newt eyes and worm feet, I agreed.

I probably should have checked Google before agreeing to take part in the challenge but I found out that Bulgarian food is practically the same as Turkish food (which isn’t surprising as, as you can see from the map, Turkey is only down the road from Bulgaria) and Turkish food is one of my favourite cuisines. Yay halloumi. Yay hummus. Yay falafel. Yay those spinach and feta triangle pastry things.

One dish I came across frequently while looking for vegetarian Bulgarian inspiration was stuffed aubergines or, as it’s more commonly known in Bulgaria – Imam Bayaldy (and as with hummus, there are various variations on the spelling so don’t moan at me if I didn’t use your preferred spelling).

Vegetarian Bulgarian food
Bulgarian potatoes au gratin and Bulgarian stuffed aubergines

As this was supposed to be a challenge, I decided I should probably serve the stuffed aubergines with something more adventurous (and more Bulgarian) than plain boiled potatoes and peas, so I accompanied the stuffed aubergines with Bulgarian potatoes au gratin (which Google informs me is also called ‘ogreten’ which sounds more Bulgarian than ‘au gratin’ which sounds distinctly French to me and, according to my map, France is nowhere near Bulgaria).

Unfortunately, The Meat Eater wasn’t keen on either of these dishes and found them a bit bland. I reckon this was because he’d caught the lurgy I’d had recently, because I found the potatoes creamy and tangy, and the stuffed aubergines were – well, stuffed aubergines, which are always nice, but I’ll admit they could have been tastier.

You can find the original recipe for the Bulgarian stuffed aubergines here and the original recipe for the Bulgarian potatoes au gratin here. As usual, the recipes below are my adaptations, using ingredients I have to hand/can find in the supermarket and simplified to suit my cooking methods/laziness.

Bulgarian Stuffed Aubergines (Imam Bayaldy)
Recipe Type: Vegetarian
Cuisine: Bulgarian
Author: Cathy @ Planet Veggie
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1 large aubergine
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 carrot, chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 tbsp parsley
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 tbsp fresh breadcrumbs
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 180C/gas mark 4.
  2. Heat the oil in a frying pan, add the onion and fry gently for about 5 minutes, until soft.
  3. Meanwhile, cut the aubergine in half lengthwise and scoop out the flesh, leaving the skins intact.
  4. Chop the aubergine flesh and add to the onions and cook for a further 5 minutes.
  5. Add the tomatoes, carrot, garlic, parsley, bay leaf, salt and pepper and cook for a further 5 minutes.
  6. Stuff the aubergine skins with the onion mixture, place in an ovenproof dish and sprinkle with the breadcrumbs.
  7. Cook for 20-30 minutes.
Bulgarian Potatoes au Gratin
Recipe Type: Bulgarian
Cuisine: Vegetarian
Author: Cathy @ Planet Veggie
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 450g cottage cheese
  • 50g butter, melted
  • 3 medium potatoes, sliced 1/8″ thick
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 cup Greek yoghurt
  • salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. Heat oven to 180C/gas mark 4.
  2. Lightly grease an ovenproof dish with butter or oil.
  3. In a blender or food processor (I used a hand blender), puree cheese until as smooth as possible.
  4. Add the butter, salt and pepper and blend in thoroughly.
  5. Lay one-third of the potatoes in the ovenproof dish and top with one-third of the cheese mixture. Lay down another third of potatoes and cheese, followed by the last third.
  6. Cover the dish with foil and bake until the potatoes are tender, about 1- 11/2 hours.
  7. In a bowl, whisk together the eggs and yoghurt and season with salt and pepper.
  8. Pour over the potatoes and bake, uncovered, until the topping is puffy, golden and set, about 20-30 minutes.

Check out these other vegetarian Expedia World on a Plate recipes from my fellow bloggers:

Simple Fig Jam from Fab Food 4 All
Plum, Apple and Almond Tarte Tatin from Foodie Quine
Quick and Easy Creamy Mushroom Pasta from The Hedge Combers
Olive, Garlic, Halloumi, Spelt Bread – Eliopsomi from Tin and Thyme

This post was sponsored by Expedia World on a Plate. 

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Recipe: Battered Halloumi

vegetarian-battered-halloumi

I love halloumi. I love the saltiness, the squeakiness and the oh-my-god-it’s-just-so-fucking-delicious-ness of it. In the fridge languished half a block that needed to be used up and instead of stuffing it in the portobella mushrooms that are also languishing in the fridge needing to be used up, I decided to batter the halloumi, like they do in my local chippy.

I’ve made Yorkshire Puddings and battered tofu before, but I’ve never made a chip shop type batter. I whisked up the flour, milk and baking powder and seasoned it with salt and pepper but I felt it was missing something. The Meat Eater said it wasn’t and said that was how batter is made so I took his word for it, even though he couldn’t tell me how he knew how to make batter. He also assured me that it’s supposed to be the texture of wallpaper paste.

This battered halloumi was so, so good. It was even better than the chip shop’s. The halloumi had softened and lost its squeak and weirdly developed the texture of fish.

I don’t have a deep fat fryer, so I used the Tefal wok-type pan I use for almost everything. I’ve had it over ten years and I still think it’s brilliant and you can buy one here. (This post isn’t sponsored by Tefal, I just wanted to tell you how much I love my wok.)

Now I want to batter all the things.

Battered Halloumi
Cuisine: Vegetarian
Author: Cathy @ Planet Veggie
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • 1/2 block halloumi, sliced into 4 pieces
  • 60g plain flour
  • 30ml water
  • 30ml milk
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • salt and pepper
  • Oil for deep frying
Instructions
  1. Heat the oil in a large pan or deep fat fryer if you have one
  2. Whisk together the flour, milk, water and baking powder and season with salt and pepper
  3. Check the oil is hot enough by dropping in a bit of batter. If it floats and sizzles, the oil is hot enough
  4. Dredge the halloumi in the batter and fry for 5-10 minutes, until golden, turning over a few times

 

If you like the look of this battered halloumi, you may also like these beer battered mushrooms from Amuse Your Bouche.




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Recipe: Sweet Potato, Chickpea & Coconut Curry

Vegan sweet potato, chickpea and coconut curry

I mentioned last week my energy levels had slumped, so I googled to see which foods were good for energy. Among those mentioned were:

Sweet potatoes

Sweet potatoes contain Vitamin D and, as we all know, at this time of year when summer’s coming to an end and there’s a lack of sunlight, our energy levels can crash, along with our mood. The Vitamin D in sweet potatoes will boost your energy, along with the natural sugars it contains which are released slowly into the bloodstream to keep your energy levels balanced.

Chickpeas

Chickpeas are a source of manganese which is important in energy production. So if you ever needed an excuse to eat more hummus, here it is. You’re welcome.

Coconut milk 

Although coconut milk has a high level of saturated fats, those saturated fats are mainly short and medium chain fatty acids which are not stored by the body as fats but provide instant energy to the body.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes have a high content of biotin which is also known as Vitamin H which is, confusingly, part of the B complex group of vitamins. But, you don’t need to worry about that (unless you’re doing some kind of medical degree which requires you to know about these things) – all you need to know is that B vitamins help the body produce energy.

So, I had a list of healthy ingredients and, faced with these ingredients, there was only one thing to make – a curry. And not just any old curry but a creamy vegan curry that raised my energy levels and gave me a natural boost.

Maybe I should have called it Sunshine Curry.

Sweet Potato, Chickpea & Coconut Curry
Recipe Type: Curry
Cuisine: Vegan
Author: Cathy @ Planet Veggie
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 1 onion
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp fresh ginger, grated
  • 1 red chili, deseeded and chopped
  • 400g can chopped tomatoes
  • 400g can chickpeas, drained
  • 1 large sweet potato, peeled and chopped into 1″ chunks
  • 400ml can coconut milk
  • Salt to season
Instructions
  1. In a large saucepan (or Tefal wok, like I use), heat the vegetable oil and fry the onion for a few minutes, until softened
  2. Add the garlic, chili, and ginger to the onions, along with the dried spices and fry for another couple of minutes
  3. Add the chickpeas, tomatoes, coconut milk and the sweet potato and bring to the boil
  4. Turn the heat down, season with salt, cover and simmer for 30 minutes
  5. Remove the cover and let simmer for another 20 minutes
  6. Serve with Basmati rice

 

 

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