Vegan Bánh Mi with Tofoo Tofu, Pickled Vegetables & Sriracha Mayo

Tofoo tofu
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As the self-proclaimed Queen of Tofu, when I heard about a new brand of tofu called Tofoo, I was obviously keen to give it a go. Tofoo is different than the usual block of Cauldron found in any supermarket, as it’s ready-pressed (yes, I said ready pressed – no more reams of kitchen roll!*) and ready-flavoured in smoked, Indian spiced and Oriental spiced varieties (the latter two coming in cubes). There’s also a naked one, ready for you to do whatever it is you like doing with tofu (if it’s something other than eating it, you probably need help. Just because it’s called ‘naked’ doesn’t mean you should get pervy with it).

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Vegan Tofu & Mushroom Mini Quiches

Vegan tofu and mushroom quiche

I went to London VegFest the other week and for once, I actually came out looking forward to the next year’s event. On the previous years I’ve been, it’s been cramped, overcrowded and I hadn’t been able to get anywhere near the stalls, let alone try anything or buy anything. This year, although it was in the same space and I’m going to assume they weren’t turning stallholders or customers away, there was plenty of room to walk around and to see and sample everything, and sample things I certainly did.

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Smooth and Creamy Tofu Hummus – a Tasty Alternative to Chickpeas

vegan silken tofu hummus

I’m not suggesting for a moment you ditch the more traditional chickpea hummus – especially when I have the recipe for the best hummus in the world ever but, if you fancy a hummus/spread/dip type thing but can’t be bothered to go to the supermarket for a tin of chickpeas but you do have a carton of silken tofu and a jar of tahini in the house, then this is the recipe for you. As an added bonus, unlike the recipe for the best hummus in the world ever, you don’t have to wait for this tofu hummus to cool down.

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Tofuture Tofu Press and Tofu Making Kit Giveaway

Tofuture Tofu Press

It has come to my attention there are people out there who don’t press tofu. If you’re one of these people, then please read on because you NEED what I’m giving away today. If you’re someone who’s seen the tofu light and already presses your tofu, then you should also please read on because you probably press your tofu by balancing books and other heavy shit on top of it and therefore you also NEED this tofu press. If you’re one of the people who read my review the other week and have already bought one of these presses, you should also read on because you probably know someone who doesn’t press tofu and therefore you can give them this tofu press and be their best friend forever.

Or you can just flog it on ebay.

Tofuture tofu press

Either way, this giveaway is for A Very Good Thing Indeed. You might have seen me gushing about the Tofuture Tofu Press a couple of weeks ago but if not (or if you want to refresh your memory), you can read my review of it here. And not only am I giving away a Tofuture Tofu Press, Tofuture are also chucking in one of their tofu making kits too, which contains:

  • 500g soya beans
  • 35g nigari
  • 2 cheesecloth squares
  • a set of instructions
Tofuture tofu making kit
That strange looking substance is nigari – don’t try to smoke it

See that bag of white stuff in the photo? I thought Tofuture had also chucked in a bag of crystal meth for me, but that’s the nigari – a coagulant used in making tofu. Although, obviously I was disappointed not to get the chance to recreate a scene from Breaking Bad (ideally with a semi-clad Jesse), it was probably just as well, as I would have no idea how to declare Class A drugs on my tax return.

Tofu press

Anyway, semi-clad Jesses aside, what makes this tofu press different from others (not that there are many; I’ve only seen a couple, and they’ve only been available from the US) is that this press completely contains the tofu (middle container) and the water it’s pressing out (container on the left), so once you’ve pulled the bands down over the hooks (the container on the right goes on top of the middle container holding the tofu, squeezing the water out into the container on the left), that’s it.

Then you can put the press out of the way in the fridge and you don’t have to worry about having to keep adjusting the springs or putting it on a plate or in the sink to catch the water. After you’ve pressed your tofu, you can then use the container to marinate it in. Genius.

This tofu press is brilliant and you NEED one.

The Tofuture tofu press fits neatly in your fridge

Win a Tofuture Tofu Press and Tofu Making Kit 

Tofu press and tofu making kit
The prizes (your tofu press will be in a box the same as the one at the top of this post)

Do you want to win one of these Tofuture Tofu Presses and Tofu Making Kits and promise to do tofu justice by pressing it, therefore improving the texture and its capacity to soak up all the lovely flavours of whatever it is you’re cooking it in/with?

You do? Okay then, you can enter via the Rafflecopter thingybob below. Good luck!

p.s. I don’t condone the use of drugs.

p.p.s. Not crystal meth, anyway.

p.p.s.s. Not that I’ve had it.

p.p.p.s.s. I’m going to stop here before I get myself in trouble. (Actually, I’m going to stop here because I don’t know if p.p.p.s.s. is correct and I can’t be bothered to look it up.)

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Many thanks to Tofuture for providing the prizes. For more information about Tofuture, their tofu press or their tofu making kit, visit the Tofuture website. They’re also holding their own competition to win one of their presses, which you can check out here. If you can’t wait to get your hands on one of these presses, you can:

a) buy one direct from the Tofuture website for £25; or

b) buy one on Amazon for £25.

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Tofuture Tofu Press Review: No More Soggy Tofu!

Tofuture Tofu Press

When the postman knocked on the door and handed me the Tofuture Tofu Press, I hadn’t been so excited about a few pieces of plastic since getting my first Spirograph in the early 80s. As you’ve probably guessed, you don’t draw pretty pictures with the Tofuture Tofu Press though; you press tofu with it.

As anyone knows, tofu needs pressing. It needs pressing to make it edible; unpressed tofu is a gungy, spongy, soggy block of slime and I wish I’d learnt about pressing it earlier than I did. Now I have learnt to press tofu, I eat it regularly (you can check out my tofu recipes here) but the one thing I was missing was something practical and convenient to press it with. My method was to wrap the tofu in reams of kitchen roll and then press it between two saucers – either quickly with my hands or for longer with heavy objects balanced on top. Although both methods work to an extent, they have their failings – I had visions of the saucers snapping and slicing my hands with the hand method and the last time I used the heavy objects method, I balanced a cast iron frying pan on the top saucer, then balanced my Nutribullet on top of the frying pan. I was happily playing on my computer upstairs when I heard a crash in the kitchen. On investigation, I found the frying pan had slipped off the saucer and bashed into the wall, breaking a kitchen wall tile. A brand new kitchen wall tile in the BRAND NEW KITCHEN THE MEAT EATER HAD ONLY JUST PUT TOGETHER WITH HIS OWN FAIR HANDS. Oh man, was I in trouble. Luckily, the Meat Eater had had a tax rebate or something and was in a good mood and when I confessed what I’d done (I couldn’t really not confess – there was a big hole in the kitchen wall where a tile should have been) he just shrugged.

Phew.

Unsurprisingly, ever since then, I’ve been nervous about using the ‘stack a load of heavy shit on it’ tofu-pressing method, so when Tofuture offered to send me one of their tofu presses, I got mega-excited. As in HALLELUJAH PRAISE THE TOFU-PRESSING LORD excited.

Tofuture tofu press

The Tofuture Tofu Press is small, compact and no bigger than it needs to be. It comes in three pieces, which all stack neatly inside each other.

Tofuture tofu press

I had a block of tofu (just the normal block of Cauldron you can find in all supermarkets) in the fridge, waiting to be pressed and because I’m a geek and wanted a before and after comparison, I measured it first. Please excuse the dirty ruler (and in case you’re wondering what para it’s ruling out, it’s parasites [the ruler was a freebie from the vet]. I have nothing against paramedics or paralegals).

Before the tofu was pressed

The tofu fits perfectly inside the inner tub.

Tofu about to be pressed

The inner tub is placed inside the main tub (which will catch the water), then the top is placed over the inner tub and you pull down the elastic bands over the hooks, then pull the clasps back, which will cause the top to press down on the tofu, squeezing the water out.

Tofuture tofu press

The elastic bands are quite difficult to get over the hooks but if the bands were slack, then there’d be no pressure on the tofu and no water would get squeezed out and then it wouldn’t be a tofu press; it’d just be a tofu container.

Tofuture tofu press

As mentioned above, the tofu press is compact and when your tofu is sitting safely inside it, it fits beautifully in your fridge, nestled in amongst whatever it is you keep in your fridge (mine had a respectable amount of vegetables in it when I took this photo; sometimes it only contains beer and chocolate, but I didn’t borrow these vegetables just for the photo, honest. Although, that’s an embarrassing amount of plastic *makes mental note to reinstate Riverford veg box and stop buying plastic-wrapped veg from Tesco*).

The Tofuture tofu press fits neatly in your fridge

Although I’d planned to leave the tofu pressing for a few hours, after an hour, I couldn’t resist a peek. I took the tofu press out of the fridge and could feel the water sploshing around in the bottom and when I poured it out, there was 100ml of water.

Water pressed from tofu after 1 hour

After five hours had passed, I took the tofu out of the fridge and poured out the water that had collected since I’d emptied it and there was another 25ml.

Water pressed from tofu after five hours

And as you can see, the tofu had shrunk by about half (in case you can’t be bothered to scroll back up, it was 4cm high before being pressed).

Tofu after pressing

And guess what I made with my newly pressed tofu (after marinading it in the press – another use for it)? I’ll give you a clue – it was on a Friday. Yep, tofush! I’m not lying when I say this is the best tofush I’ve made so far – whether that’s down to the Tofuture Tofu Press or my immense tofu-battering skillz or a combination of both, I don’t know. All I know is that I’m very happy with the press and will be using it to press all my tofu in the future. No more broken kitchen wall tiles, yay.

Tofush and chips

How to get your hands on a Tofuture Tofu Press 

Okay, so now you want one of these tofu presses, don’t you? You’ve got a few options: you can either:

a) buy one direct from the Tofuture website for £25; or

b) buy one on Amazon for £25; or

c) buy one from Tofuture in person at Brighton VegFest (it’s over now) or London VegFest for £20; or

d) enter the competition on the Tofuture website to win one for absolutely no money at all (I’d go for that one if I were you). (Update: The competition is now closed.)

The Tofuture Tofu Press is Vegetarian Society Approved and Vegan Society Approved. For more information, visit the Tofuture website.

I’d like to give Tofuture approximately twenty-six billion thanks for sending me one of their tofu presses to review. All my gushing is genuine. I fucking love this thing. 




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Vegan Tofush / Tofish & Chips Recipe

Vegan tofush and chips and tartar sauce

First, I need to share with you the vegan tofush and chips (also known as tofish) I made last night – it was so amazing (even if I do say so myself). As Friday night is chippy night and I usually have battered halloumi, I thought, as it’s Veganuary, I’d just have chips but then I thought why don’t I try and recreate the tofush from the Coach & Horses in Soho and have that with chips from the chippy? If you haven’t a clue what I’m on about and haven’t heard of the Coach & Horses in Soho or their famous tofush and chips, you can read my review of London’s first vegetarian pub here.

This tofush isn’t for the squeamish – the use of nori (sheets of dried seaweed) gives it a distinct fishy flavour so, if you don’t like the taste of fish, leave the nori out. But if you want an authentic fish-in-batter taste, leave it in and tell yourself it tastes of the sea.

Just in case making tofush wasn’t proof enough of my genius, I further excelled myself and made my own vegan tartar sauce by mixing together some vegan mayonnaise and pickle relish.

You may be wondering how I managed to go to the chip shop and make tofush at the same time. Even I’m not that much of a genius and I made the tofush while The Meat Eater was at the chippy, keeping it warm in the oven until he got back.

I’ll share the recipe for the vegan tofush below but I’ll just give a quick run through of what else I ate on Veganuary Day 8.

Breakfast

Yes, it’s the same as I’ve had for the last week – a spinach, apple, clementine and chia seeds Nutriblast. I’ve bought some raspberries now so I’ll be having a different breakfast Nutriblast soon. Get me and my impulsiveness.

Lunch

banana, kiwi fruit, strawberry, blueberry and soya milk Nutriblast

A gloriously healthy lunch, knowing dinner was going to be a full-on pig-out. This Nutriblast contains banana, kiwi fruit, strawberries, blueberries and soya milk.

Snacks

As usual, I spent some of the day drinking hot chocolate and eating Oat Flips and Oreos.

Recipe: Vegan Tofush 

vegan tofush

Vegan Tofush
 
Prep time
Cook time
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Inspired by the tofush and chips at Norman's Coach & Horses, Soho, London
Author:
Recipe type: Tofu
Cuisine: Vegan
Serves: 1-2
Ingredients
For the tofu
  • ½ block firm tofu, pressed and sliced in half
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • salt
  • ½ sheet nori, cut into two (so you have two strips of nori)
For the batter
  • 30ml water
  • 30ml soya milk
  • 60g plain flour
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • salt and pepper

    Oil for deep-frying
Instructions
  1. Mix together the olive oil, lemon juice and salt in a bowl/tupperware dish and marinade the tofu in it for a few hours (or minutes if you forget to do it earlier).
  2. Whisk together the ingredients for the batter in a bowl.
  3. Heat the oil for deep-frying (test it's hot enough by dropping a bit of batter into it - if it sizzles, it's ready).
  4. Meanwhile, wrap the strips of nori around the tofu and secure it with a toothpick or two (just remember to remove them after frying!)
  5. Dredge the nori-wrapped tofu in the batter and deep-fry for two to three minutes, until golden.


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Recipe: Smoky Marinated Tofu in Pitta Bread

Tofu marinated in sesame oil, sriracha, liquid smoke and nutritional yeast

I hadn’t had tofu for ages, so it was time to remedy that and raid the cupboard and fridge for condiments and drag the George Foreman out of the cupboard.

The result was cripsy, smoky, spicy tofu that I stuffed in a Food Doctor seeded pitta bread (only £1 for 6 in Tesco) with spinach, olives and mayo.

Recipe: Marinated Tofu in Pitta Bread
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Cuisine: Vegan
Serves: 1
Ingredients
  • ½ block tofu, pressed and sliced in half
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 1 tbsp sriracha
  • A few drops liquid smoke
Instructions
  1. Mix up the sesame oil, nutritional yeast, sriracha and liquid smoke and coat the tofu in it, rubbing it in with your hands
  2. Leave to marinate for a few hours (or minutes, depending on how organised you are in planning ahead)
  3. Grill on a George Foreman grill for 10-15 minutes, until crispy
  4. Stuff in pitta bread with salad

 

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Recipe: Vegan Banana Chocolate Tofu Mousse

 

Raw vegan chocolate banana mousse

Back in January, I made a vegan chocolate mousse. I kept meaning to make it again because a) it’s delicious; and b) seriously quick and easy to make. But, like most things, I didn’t get round to it.

Until today, that is. After being inspired by Choclette’s banana and chocolate post, I decided to make the mousse again, but this time with added banana.

If you’re looking for a quick and easy vegan mousse recipe that uses tofu instead of avocado, then look no further.

Recipe: Vegan Banana Chocolate Tofu Mousse
 
Prep time
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Author:
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: Vegan
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • 1 banana
  • ¼ cup raw cacao
  • ¼ cup agave nectar
  • 349g/12oz carton silken tofu
Instructions
  1. Put everything in a food processor and blitz until smooth
  2. Leave to firm up in the fridge for a few hours

 

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Recipe: Vegan Halloumi

Vegan halloumiMy cheese consumption has gone down massively recently but when The Meat Eater said he was going back to the old chippy for our usual Friday night chippy chips, I thought I’d give their battered halloumi another go. This was the second time I’d tried battered halloumi from the chippy and the first time, I wasn’t keen, despite me usually loving halloumi. I don’t know whether it just seemed a bit odd getting it from the chippy, along with chips that’d been chucked in a huge vat of oil, or maybe I thought it was trying to fool me into thinking it was fish but, whatever it was, the first time just didn’t do it for me.

Tofu marinating in nutritional yeast, olive oil, salt and lemon juice
Tofu marinating

This time, however, I loved it and remembered how much I love halloumi (to be honest, I hadn’t forgotten. How could anyone forget how delicious it is?) and so when I saw a link to this recipe for vegan tofu halloumi on the Little Vegan Kitchen Facebook group, I knew I had to give it a go, slightly adapting the recipe to my own taste and preference.

Vegan halloumi

I wasn’t expecting it to be much of a convincing replica for halloumi but, I’ve got to say, although it doesn’t have the ‘squeak’ of dairy halloumi, it’s a salty and tangy, perfectly acceptable alternative. I’ve enjoyed it so much, I’ve been having it for lunch stuffed in pitta bread with hummus and salad for the last three days.

I used my George Foreman to get it crispy but I would imagine it’d also be great fried in a little olive oil.

Vegan halloumi

5.0 from 1 reviews
Recipe: Vegan Halloumi (Using Tofu)
 
Author:
Cuisine: Vegan
Ingredients
  • ¼ block tofu, pressed and sliced lengthways into two
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
Instructions
  1. Mix the olive oil, nutritional yeast, salt and lemon juice in a bowl
  2. Rub the tofu with the olive oil mixture and leave to soak in for about 15 minutes
  3. Grill in a George Foreman grill for about 5-10 minutes until crispy on the outside


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Vegan Lunch Tapas Style

Vegan tapas

My healthiest meal of the day by far is breakfast. I used to make a smoothie in my blender most days but then I jumped on the Nutribullet bandwagon and now have a Nutriblast of spinach or kale, fruit and coconut water each morning.

I love my Nutribullet. I love it so much, I’ve also been having a Nutriblast for lunch – albeit a bigger, thicker one made with frozen banana, whatever fruit I fancy (most recently pineapple and kiwi fruit), a handful of cashews for protein and some Alpro soya yoghurt (man, I love that stuff – it’s so much nicer than the dairy yoghurt).

Although I love my Nutriblasts, sometimes I want something more substantial for lunch and, in the summer, that something is usually salad and although I love the usual salad combo of leaves, raw veg and dressing, recently, I’ve been enjoying a tapas-style lunch.

stuffed vine leaves, sundried tomatoes, artichoke hearts, olives, tofu, hummus, roasted peppers

I generally don’t eat much out of jars but I can’t resist the supermarket shelves laden with artichokes, stuffed vine leaves, sundried tomatoes, roasted peppers and olives. I love to serve them with hummus (shop-bought is delicious but if you want to make your own, here’s the best ever hummus recipe) and marinated, baked tofu.

Despite this being a healthy lunch, it’s calorie-laden as the jars are packed with oil, so if you want to save some calories, pat everything (no, not the hummus!) dry with kitchen roll to mop up a load of oil.

Marinated Baked Tofu
 
Prep time
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Total time
 
Author:
Cuisine: Vegan
Serves: 1
Ingredients
  • ⅓ block tofu, pressed and cubed
  • Marinade of your choice (I used Jack Daniel's BBQ Sauce)
Instructions
  1. Coat the tofu in the marinade and leave to soak in for a few hours
  2. Line a baking tray with baking paper and bake the tofu in the oven at 200C for about 20-30 minutes

 

 

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